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Chapter I: What Do I Want?

Chapter 1 What Do I Want ? Study Group.

Motivations , The Unexamined Logic of Your Own Experience,
I Want Security, Pleasure and Virtue, Does Happiness Exist?
Is It in Objects?, Definition of an Object, I Am Not an Object,
Am I Separate from Objects?, Definition of Real,
The Objects Are Me, But I Am Not an Object,
Definition of Non-Duality, Life Is a Zero-Sum Game,
The Fourth Pursuit.

Moderator: milarepa

Re: Chapter 1 What Do I Want ? Study Group.

Postby Arlindo Nagar » Sat Jan 07, 2017 10:46 am

Hi Stan, hi Mira, hi everyone, I see lots of beautiful topics of discussion in the forum lately… I am trying to find the time to write a few comments… Seminar with Ramji has started on the 5th as you probably know. Very beautiful! I love the teacher and his teaching style. Very brilliant! Everything he says seems to be loaded with a clear purpose; to expose and remove one’s wrong notions and believes.

To answer your question about India, I think I may have a vasana for India that may come from another life time. I remember my first trip to Poona in 1987… I immediatly felt so much at home in India for about seven years! Now, having stayed away from India for 20+plus years I was imagining that after having developed a vasana for Europe and USA, that India with its dirtiness and poverty would be a chock, but guess what? Just after a week or so, this feeling of being back home brings again great comfort to my heart.

I love the culture, the local people, the devotional atmosphere, the depth of the symbolism behind their rituals… they all seem to know about Isvara, karma, and many of them know about the Self or awareness. Much different from the poor materialists we find in the west. And it is very special in this small town – or let’s say, in the Ramana Ashram where the Shakti and the silence is so pervasive.

On another note, with love and compassion, I see the foreigners coming and going to Tiru, others coming and staying…. All somewhat lost and without knowing why they came here, or what they are looking for. They are suffering and they mostly come looking for relieve. I met some of them, even some old friends from many years back and after some time, one thing led to the other and I ended up giving a few satsangs introductory talks on Vedanta.

By the look of it I have lost their friendship already. They do not seem to want to see me anymore :) Unfortunately they are pretty much lost in their vague experiential notions about enlightenment. Just like if in a labyrinth with no way to find the exit. They are confused due to the apparent contradictory messages coming from Ramana, who sometimes would teach dualistic Yoga and some other times pure Jnana yoga (knowledge). They all tend to hear only Ramana’s messages referent to duality; action-experience. And Ramana never really explained the relationship between knowledge and action-experience.

We Vedantins are the rare mature souls with a vision of reality as non-duality - we are “la crema della crema” of the spiritual world, and most importantly, with the understanding that as Ramana himself said; Only by knowledge alone, the self can be realized. (which is indeed related to the subject of the latest discussions in the forum which I will try to comment sometime tomorrow.) Much love to you all.

As far as your question, Anja: "Now that you have a satvic mind being in India, what is it you can and will do for India?" My mind was already predominantly sattvic before I came to India. That is one of the values of self-knowledge; the greatest purifier of the mind. In fact, I came here to see India for what I thought would be my last visit in this life time, and with no intention of getting or taking anything. Guess what? I am already making plans to come back next year. It is a kind of a love-affair.

And for my surprise, India is so abundantly “RICH”, that I have only love, respect, appreciation and gratitude to offer to them in return. We have so much to learn from the people here... Definitely, Anja, the India I see is a completely different India from the one you imagine to have seen. As you have probably heard in our Vedanta circles, Jiva’s experience is a purely subjective phenomenon. It has very little to do with Isvara’s reality.
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Re: Chapter 1 What Do I Want ? Study Group.

Postby Anja » Sat Jan 07, 2017 2:52 pm

Hi Arlindo,

thanks for sharing your thoughts, perceptions and impressions regarding India.

Here is a paper, about 105 pages long, you might want to take into consideration:

The Caste System Effects on Poverty in India, Nepal and Sri Lanka.

https://www.american.edu/cas/economics/ ... -2_Rao.pdf

By the way, James once thought, paraphrased: "I want to make India great again....spiritually, socially and economically."

Edit: Bob Dylan once answered in an interview when asked what Love is: "Love? It's an action thing."
Anja
 

Re: Chapter 1 What Do I Want ? Study Group.

Postby Arlindo Nagar » Sun Jan 08, 2017 1:11 am

Hi Anja. We all are, in different degrees, aware of injustices happening all over the world. We also experience them according to our own karmas in the field of life ruled by its meritorious system. This is all part of Isvara’s play; good and evil - dharma and adharma. This is a lawful and intelligently designed universe in which all objects are subjected to the its rules. Pleasure and pain are the inevitable opposites of life. And as you probably heard Ramji saying; You cannot win or lose in here, because life is a zero-sum play.

Yes, India is beautiful, but it is also ugly, the same way in the developed west where most people often have access to the commodities and comforts of life but are often afflicted with too much rajas. This apparent dualistic universe is a play in constant modification due to rajas and tamas energies operating 24/7. Cultivating sattva is the key to developing the vision which will allow us to see thru the pair of opposites Maya presents to our senses.

You say that James once said: "I want to make India great again.... spiritually, socially and economically." If James said so, he problem meant to say that by helping to bring the understanding of the scriptures to India society he is indirectly helping people to cancel their self-ignorance, and therefore, he would be helping them to live a more just, comfortable, and happy life. Spreading self-knowledge is the most efficient way to reestablish dharma. It is also the greatest expression of love one can offer to others - because the root cause of adharmic thoughts and actions and the suffering we find in the world are, but the wrong notions human Jivas have about the nature of the Self.

I am going to quote the Gita in order to make another important point; “It is better to do a second-rate job on your own dharma than a first-rate job on someone else’s dharma” - “Death following your own dharma is preferable to life following the dharma of others.” “Following the dharma of others is fraught with danger”

It means to say that pleasure and pain have their purpose in life. whenever we see someone suffering we can be assured that suffering is serving its purpose in the process of evolution of that soul. Nobody is a victim here. Everyone is only reaping the fruits of one’s own actions. There is no room for mistake in Isvara’s karmic-psychological system.

To quote the Gita again: “the wise neither grieves for the living nor for the dead.” It means that the wise understood the bigger picture and therefore she/he is not concerned with life or death, with pleasure or pain – it takes all as Prasad from Isvara. The wise has giving up the burden of karma by understanding that all karma belongs to Isvara and that all beings are going to follow their relative nature in any case.

And this brings us to another important issue which is not simple or easy to be understood: svadharma.

Svadharma is our most essential secondary nature as a Jiva. If one’s apparent nature is that of a general guiding his arm, his duty is to fight – specially an unfair and uninvited war. But if ones’ apparent nature is that of “doing good” to others, or of a pacifist… his/her duty is to act in harmony with its cause: to reestablish justice in whatsoever possible way. But if instead, one’s svadharma is self-knowledge and Moksha (which is the highest dharma there is), then going around trying to save the world from suffering and injustice is but a waste one one’s precious life and inteligence. As Krishna says: “Doing the dharma of others is fraught with danger”
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Re: Chapter 1 What Do I Want ? Study Group.

Postby calonxy98 » Sun Jan 08, 2017 6:42 am

You are right, you cannot win or lose here, life is a zero sum game.

But that doesn't mean that the only thing people can do is teach Vedanta and re-establish dharma. That's one way of looking at it. But the deeper meaning of this teaching is that it frees you from suffering from the results of your actions. It pulls you out of your intertia or win/lose mentality and sets you up to understand that yes, even tho you're not going to gain or lose anything by offering service, that's perfectly OK to still serve if that's what you're compelled to do. You serve because your living from the heart with compassion and awareness instead of being closed to the world in an imaginary world of otherness where your only options are fear and harm, you're now free to care for yourself because there is only yourself here, what else you gonna do with your life? There is nothing to get and nothing to lose so this frees you to give unconditionally to those who need it.

This is what this teaching means once you assimilate it. If you understand this teaching try to hold yourself back from trying to serve others compassionately. I bet you can't ! And if you don't feel the urge in your heart to serve others, give away all of your love then there is something gone really awry with your lightenment !!!

Be careful about believing this literally that all people are getting what they deserve. This only means on the level that they have influence over, in terms of taking control of their lives and living dharmically and in control of their future karma's. You're making the mistake of believing in literal reincarnation where one is born into a situation of horror because the last person made some mistakes in a previous lifetime. This is a fairlytale and a very dangerous teaching. Don't confuse this with innocent people dying in war torn countries or dictatorships, to say that those people are paying their karmic debts is a disgrace to humanity and the self. There is a lot enlightened people can do to make a difference. Use the teaching to awaken you, don't take it too seriously, it's there to free us from limitation not impose limitation on us in the form of doctrin...

And please don't come at me with this do-gooder teaching. As you prolly know, that is only meant to shine awareness on people who do good actions to cover up the emptiness they feel inside. To act to compensate for the gaping hole they imagine in their heart. Do goodies are not genuine, they are fakes and they are suffering. But a happy and free person is not limited to this Vedanta business, throw Vedanta away once it's done its job. It's a thorn to be used to remove another thorn, and both thorns to be discarded once the job is complete.

And I know you don't want any hot-heads here, but I had to reply to this comment because it's just ridiculous.

I apologize for my harmful tones, I have trouble with this view that the Geeta presents. I'm almost 99% positive that these ideas are meant to remove ignorance and then stop there at the removal of said ignorance. After that happens then there is no doctrine that can stop an enlightened person from helping others in any way they want. :shock:
Last edited by calonxy98 on Sun Jan 08, 2017 9:01 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Chapter 1 What Do I Want ? Study Group.

Postby Anja » Sun Jan 08, 2017 8:23 am

Hi Colonxy,

thanks for the comment. I couldn't have said it better myself, companiero.

Hi Arlindo,

please don't spank me with Bhagavad-Gita quotes. I'm not your student. I can destroy the whole first premise of the Bhagavad-Gita in a single sentense, if neccessary. I studied this particular scripture for a while by now, comparing different translations and the commentaries on it. I'm able and educated enough to write my own comments on it, if that would be asked of me.

And here is a question for you, Arlindo: What is the first premise of the Bhagavad-Gita? In other words: What is the foundation the Bhagavad-Gita's teaching draws from?
Anja
 

Re: Chapter 1 What Do I Want ? Study Group.

Postby Andrew » Sun Jan 08, 2017 9:28 am

DANGER WILL ROBINSON....THIS THREAD IS DRIFTING.

I am not a moderator but I am going to take this opportunity to suggest, very politely that this discussion is not serving the needs of it's dharma which is to share our responses to chapter 1 of James' book.

So for the sake of digital dharma can that please be observed?

Anything that does not support that end needs to be either reined in or moved to another part of the site. There is room for all of this discussion but please, can we not clog up the Study Group threads with tangents?

The study group sections are intended to facilitate specific, content related discussion which may have the added benefit of serving future readers much like the satsang section of SW.

Many thanks & best wishes,

Andrew
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Re: Chapter 1 What Do I Want ? Study Group.

Postby calonxy98 » Sun Jan 08, 2017 9:30 am

Arlindo Nagar wrote:Hi Anja. We all are, in different degrees, aware of injustices happening all over the world. We also experience them according to our own karmas in the field of life ruled by its meritorious system. This is all part of Isvara’s play; good and evil - dharma and adharma. This is a lawful and intelligently designed universe in which all objects are subjected to the its rules. Pleasure and pain are the inevitable opposites of life. And as you probably heard Ramji saying; You cannot win or lose in here, because life is a zero-sum play.

. But if instead, one’s svadharma is self-knowledge and Moksha (which is the highest dharma there is), then going around trying to save the world from suffering and injustice is but a waste one one’s precious life and inteligence. b]


Hello Again,

I just wanted to say another word, and thank you for your wise words and contribution here. I am for sure a student and will take advice off anybody. I don't feel I know it all, yet I do feel I have mastered some points well. Which was my intent originally.

I agree with the vast majority of what you have said, except I have a problem with the above section of your comment. For the sake of wanting to make my intention clear, I thought I'd pop another comment to you so that its clear I'm not on the attack just for the sake if it.

Its true that life involves a fair amount of pleasure and pain. This is a fact Vedanta points out. When understood correctly this means that you are aware that there is pleasure and pain involved in living out a true value, and this is your choice to do so as a liberated person. Liberation in my eyes is not trying to escape this dualism of pain and pleasure, just to understand it, to see it for what it is, to honour it as reality and most critically not to retreat from living life in order to imagine that there is an escape from this play of opposites. Vadanta is for the mature person who understands that a life lived well is a life lived with risk and total acceptance that this dualistic play might not work out in ones favour and full understanding of the risk vs reward / pain pleasure of doing the right thing.

I would argue passionately that if your aim is moksha, then a life lived NOT diving into existence to offer your fullest love and attempt to change the suffering in the world is a life not lived in freedom. Understanding that life is both pain and pleasure, gain and loss WHILE STILL offering your deepest gifts IS moksha itself. The alternative is avoiding the pain and pleasure in a neurotic attempt to escape it. Only a free person would endure pleasure and pain in the service of others.

Thanks for the rest of your comments, very useful.
calonxy98
 

Re: Chapter 1 What Do I Want ? Study Group.

Postby Tom » Sun Jan 08, 2017 9:56 am

Hi All!

Sorry got distracted with the whole holiday season thing..... thank you for the welcome :D

I like the idea of the forum because I don't really have anyone to discuss Vedanta with. I have read both James books a couple of times now. Been through the usual spiritual whirlpool of different teachings and books. Where Vedanta has stood out for me is that it has given me a teaching and a roadmap. I've ready many books about non-duality which succeed in describing awareness but can't show me that I am that.

Chapter 1 is particularly pertinent for me! There's a particular quote which goes:

"Objects don't work as the source of happiness for a very simple reason: I seek completeness when I am already complete. I do this because I do not know who I am".

I struggle with this over and over again. I go back to this kind of default where I seek happiness in objects then I have to remind myself its knowledge I need to be seeking. I am cursed with lots of lovely non-duel epithenies where it all seems to make sense but of course these pass and my mind turns them into experiences which I try to get back.... thus the cycle continues!!! Luckily I am conscious of this process now and am dealing with it :?
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Re: Chapter 1 What Do I Want ? Study Group.

Postby Stan » Sun Jan 08, 2017 10:03 am

Hi Bob,

Sorry for the late reply. i`ve just recovered from a really heavy cold and felt pretty much out of it.
My God, how many people have posted in the meantime ! I must admit, it`s getting hard to follow the latest posts now. I`ll talk to our web guy again about increasing the amount of ` View new posts` section at the top of the forum. It`s not something I have control over.

Anyway, your last question to me was ....

Is what I just described what you meant by "If we act taking the karma yoga attitude halfheartedly, but really, we know that deep down the vasanas are making the choices"? What choices are you referring to here? Is it the choice of being a doer, of identifying with the jiva. Maybe the problem has been a lack of appreciation that in the karma yoga attitude, that not only are the results not within our control, but even the sense of controlling our mental energies with an apparent free will, is just an appearance. Of course to the extent that there appears to be effective control, it is not our control but Ishvara's.


Nothing complicated meant here. to put it simply, taking the Karma Yoga "half heartedly" meant not acting in an appropriate and timely fashion. ie. just taking the KY attitude will not get rid of problems on it`s own. If you try to fit ky into your life instead of fitting your life into KY, it will usually not work. You have to sometimes alter your lifestyle...job, partner, work etc to make it work. only then can you get enough peace of mind to carry forward your life with the KY attitude.
I hope that makes sense after all this time. Thanks Bob.
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Re: Chapter 1 What Do I Want ? Study Group.

Postby Anja » Sun Jan 08, 2017 10:25 am

I formally appologize for derailing this thread, if I did so. What I wanted to answer here is the question: What do I want?

Since I studied not just the Bhagavad-Gita and its various translations and commentaries but also read a few Upanishads and almost everything available from Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj, also having a relative good overview of who nowerdays is sitting in the advaita vedanta teacher-seat, my understanding of the teachings of advaita vedanta (non duality) is as follows:

Me, having the privilige to be able to study those teaching, because I can read and write, have shelter and enough food, enough spare-time and exess to the internet, am responsible BECAUSE of those facts, to help others to get into a position to also have those pre-conditions that are neccessary to study properly. Someone who might be willing to study this particular subject but can't because of the economic and social cirumstances one finds oneself in, poverty for example, does not have easy exess to the teachings, unfortunately. So in order to study, people who are interested but can't do it because their living-conditions are not allowing it, should, in my perspective become the opportunity to be able to study advaita-vedanta by ACTUALLY helping them to improve their circumstances so they can have exess to these wonderfull teachings.

Someone living in utter poverty might have interest in learning and studying but can't affort to do so. THAT I would like to work on. What good does it do if we, who greately benefitted from this teachings, can't help those in need to do the same?

That's my whole point.

Thanks for having me.
Anja
 

Re: Chapter 1 What Do I Want ? Study Group.

Postby Stan » Sun Jan 08, 2017 10:47 am

Hi Anja,

I`ve just seen your last post and see no reason for for you not to post your views.
However, ...you are off topic.
It`s pretty clear to see what the topics are, especially in the study group where each chapter has it`s own little contents description.
How about you post your `off topic` posts in the `general discussions` section ? we could then expand on that topic if there`s enough interest. thanks.

Hi Calon,

Could you too please be careful about slipping out of topic ? I know that it`s tempting sometimes to expand further on what you`re trying to get across but can you hold those points until later in the study group....or make them in the `general discussions` section. thanks.

This goes for everyone. please try to focus on the topic in question as much as possible. This applies in particular to our `personal` views as vedanta is completelly objective. It doesn`t work otherwise.

Thanks guys.
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Re: Chapter 1 What Do I Want ? Study Group.

Postby Mira » Sun Jan 08, 2017 11:38 am

Wow! Lots of interesting posts on the forum this morning!

Stan, may I suggest that, if possible, we move the posts about Arlindo's comments on his India trip and Anja and Calon's counter comments to a new topic in General Discussion.

While I'm not familiar with this particular format, sometimes it can be difficult to split a thread and move only certain posts. So an easier way might be to simply copy the relevant posts to a new topic under General Discussion and then delete them under Chapter 1.

That way, we can keep that interesting topic discussion going and also not dilute the Chapter 1 study group.

Thanks Stan for all you do and for keeping us on track.
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Re: Chapter 1 What Do I Want ? Study Group.

Postby Stan » Sun Jan 08, 2017 2:37 pm

Hi Mira,

Thanks for your suggestion re moving Arlindo`s India trip comments and the relevant replies by Anja and Calon.I tried to do that earlier today...and failed.
I`m not sure if the forum software needs attention or the most likely option, my unfamiliarity with it`s working. I`ll devote more study time to that tomorrow.

I shall in the meantime start a new topic in `general discussions` and move the posts there as you suggested. Thanks for that prompt Mira, it`s a really good suggestion.

I`m not able to be full time or anywhere near on the forum so i`d be most grateful to get notice of any points that need my attention. Thanks Andrew for pointing out that we were getting off topic earlier. I can see a need for more mods in the not too distant future. If anybody`s interested, please pm me ....thanks.

Learnt something new today thanks to Andrew. ie " DANGER WILL ROBINSON ". had to google it.

https://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Lost_in_Space

Crepes Suzette ! Lol ... i`m out of here for tonight. :-)
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Re: Chapter 1 What Do I Want ? Study Group.

Postby Mira » Tue Jan 10, 2017 6:29 pm

Hi Tom,
Thanks for your post and for joining our discussion group! It's great to have you here :D.

Tom wrote: I like the idea of the forum because I don't really have anyone to discuss Vedanta with.

I totally agree. How many of us have people in our everyday lives who have even heard of Vedanta?! I certainly don't and therefore I think this forum such a great place to connect with like-minded people :D.

"Objects don't work as the source of happiness for a very simple reason: I seek completeness when I am already complete. I do this because I do not know who I am".

Thanks for this quote. It's a great one! In fact, we should all keep our favorite quotes in mind as we go through the chapters and post them. It will make a great collection of quotes in the study group.

I struggle with this over and over again. I go back to this kind of default where I seek happiness in objects then I have to remind myself its knowledge I need to be seeking.

I'm no expert, but I can tell you from my own experience that the seductive allure of objects does lessen over time. Now when I get 'good news' I sometimes catch myself seeing the downside of it right away! That mithya is a zero sum game keeps getting confirmed with time and experiences.
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Re: Chapter 1 What Do I Want ? Study Group.

Postby Ian W. » Wed Jan 18, 2017 7:56 pm

Back the original post:


What brought you to vedanta in the first place ?


That's a matter of perspective, as I could start anywhere, seen from the point of a number of themes.

However, the first time I heard of it was through an invitation for a weekend talk. Someone was going to be giving a talk at a place that I went for regular satsangs. There used to be a regular weekly Eckhart Tolle satsang, but it developed into a less-regular sampling of various non-dual teachers satsang. I could've easily missed this particular intro to vedanta satsang, but I must have felt that this would be a good one to attend.

To attend the satsang, we had a brief homework assignment, to read a brief bit of writing by James Swartz. It all made sense to me, and I headed to the satsang.

I don't remember the man's name at all, but he basically talked about how Vedanta had turned his life around, and that How to Attain Enlightenment was the book to read to understand what it was all about. He also didn't limit his praise to James Swartz, but also talked about Vivekachoodamani and some other books and teachers.

how was your life up to that point ?


It's hard to say if it was really that different before.

Did you `find` vedanta via a fairly stable, if subconscious underlying inquiry or did you feel driven to it as something of a last hope for peace of mind ?


Stable and conscious. I had been into Tolle for a decade. However, the year or so prior to Vedanta, Tolle alone wasn't doing the trick. I tried a lot of different things: Byron Katie, Abraham Hicks, channeling, Deepak Chopra, and many teachers like Adyashanti, Mooji, etc.

I can't even read Tolle now. It just seems so pointless after Vedanta. I have no interest in Adyashanti or Mooji. Chopra is super boring. Abraham Hicks and The Secret just seem embarrassing.

Can you say what you were seeking for up to that point and if possible, why you hadn`t found it yet.


Just peace of mind. As a jiva I still haven't found it completely.

As most of us will know from prior study, happiness is not in the object but, isn`t vedanta an object ? why study it ?


There's nothing better. I'm just driven to study and use it.
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Re: Chapter 1 What Do I Want ? Study Group.

Postby karan » Sun Jun 11, 2017 1:09 pm

Hello all, my name is Karan and I am a few weeks short of my 30th birthday.

My spiritual journey began around 2010-2011 when I was in a PhD program in economics in Boulder, CO. At that point in life, I was completely in samsara, just following my vasanas around mindlessly. I did not put much thought into what I wanted in life - I was just following what I was "supposed" to do blindly. I lived what one would consider a pretty normal life: two loving parents - though not much emotion/love was verbally expressed in the household, I understood their love as a given, underlying fact based on their actions. Anyway, when I got to grad school, I realized that academic economics was not what I wanted to do with my life, and I began to have an existential crisis. I realized that I was confused and alone, and needed help/guidance.

Luckily for me, I am somewhat of a self-starter and I began to binge on all kinds of self-help books and psychology books. I eventually discovered Eckhart Tolle, A Course in Miracles, and Alan Watts. I was absolutely hooked - I read, re-read, highlighted, journaled, contemplated, and meditated for hours. I would lose sleep and shirk my schoolwork in order to focus more time on figuring this spiritual thing out. I burned through the spiritual marketplace like a wildfire, blessed with a keen BS detector to weed out the "lesser" teachings. My seeking came to an end about 1 year into the journey when I discovered James on a BATGAP interview. I connected with his no-nonsense, matter-of-fact method of teaching that simply made sense. I even attended James's weekend seminar in 2013 in Golden, CO hosted by Christian Leeby. I am forever grateful for him and the teachings of Vedanta. Without them, I would be so lost in this confusing, rollercoaster ride that we call life.

I decided to focus my career towards medicine, and thought it would be a great sadhana to go through while applying the teachings of Vedanta. I moved home to Dallas while doing medical research in order to strengthen my resume for medical school. All the while, I meditated daily and attempted to apply the teachings. By the grace of Bhagavan I got accepted to a medical school in El Paso, TX, and this is where I have resided for the last 2 years (and for the next 2 as well).

It has been rather difficult to keep up with the practice during the last couple years. I do think Vedanta has helped improve my disposition and better manage my emotions, but the vasanas still bind strong. I have fallen prey to many vasanas - even strengthening a few. But every time I get caught up in one of the "lows", I harken back to the teachings to help steady me. My goal is to attain moksha and inspire other people to become interested in Vedanta/spirituality by the way I live my life.

I know my life will only become busier and busier. It will be a challenge to apply the teachings, but I am looking forward to it. I am still young and have lots of maturing to do, so it is nice to have a roadmap to guide me! It is really great to read all of your stories here, it gives me motivation to keep plugging away.
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Re: Chapter 1 What Do I Want ? Study Group.

Postby Mira » Mon Jun 12, 2017 8:59 am

Hi Karan,
I wanted to say a big welcome to the forum! I enjoyed reading your post. It's wonderful that you have found Vedanta and James at a young age. I wonder how my life would have been had I found Vedanta in my 20s :D. A lot less stressful, I imagine.

Yes, vasanas bind and especially in medicine, I imagine, you must face a competitive environment. But I love your notion of introducing people to Vedanta and your profession would be a great avenue for that (with the mind-body connection being so important for maintaining health and treating disease). What specialty are you interested in?

Again, welcome!
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Re: Chapter 1 What Do I Want ? Study Group.

Postby karan » Wed Jun 14, 2017 8:11 pm

Hi Mira,

Thanks for the warm welcome!

I am lucky in that my environment is not very competitive. The school fosters a great community and we are more or less helpful with one another rather than gunning for the top spot. I am interested in surgery at the moment, which is interesting because when I entered medical school that was on the lower end of my list of specialties. However, I enjoy the challenge and to be honest it's just pretty damn fun & cool to do procedures! It is a high-stress environment, but I welcome the challenge with a karma yoga attitude.
karan
 
Posts: 2
Joined: Sun Jun 11, 2017 12:15 pm

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